New Recruiting Toys

We seem to talk, read and write every day about something new happening in the world of recruiting and – lately – the conversations have concentrated around social networking, mobile apps and video.  Personally, I think these are fantastic tools and certainly the future of recruitment.

Social networking is an ongoing activity and must be focused on each day in order to reap results.  However, conducting searches and making calls/introductions to new candidates seems to be a topic that is not being focused on as much today as it was as little as one year ago.

Is the recent lack of more traditional recruitment talk due to it not being a “sexy” topic or whether recruiters are actually focusing their time more on these emerging tools other recruitment methodologies.

Have you found your sourcing has changed with these new tools?  Are you spending more time searching social media over the channels you were using not too long ago?  Have you revised your approach to candidates at all as a result of social media?

I look forward to your comments!

What’s Your Hardest Req

What a line, and what a sales pitch for 3rd party recruiters.  Yep, I’ve used it as well in a different place and a different time.sales-pitch

Why did this work so well?  Agencies and other 3rd party recruiters had access to the sites that a lot of companies didn’t have access to recruit talent.  This was in a time when posting your resume was step #1 in your job search.

 

 Today, posting your resume isn’t always on your list.  Sure there are circumstances when you want your resume out there for recruiters to grab quickly and it is still completely acceptable and legit.

 

 However, in today’s social networking climate, the chance that you post a resume is reducing immensely.  Why, you can let your network know your status (looking for my next gig in _____) and then work your network OR let your network work for you.  This is part of the value in having a strong and relevant network and having a relationship with your network.  But I digress from this tangent… another topic for another day.

 

Companies are not as eager to give agencies or 3rd party recruiters their reqs because the introduction and adoption of social media into HR and recruiting activity into the corporate environment is allowing corporate recruiters to be seen and heard regularly, either in conjunction with their company logo or separate from that logo.

 

The only catch with this is that corporate recruiters now need to figure out the best way for candidates to see them, or want to see them.

 

Again, it comes back to value.  If all you do is push jobs then you will be viewed as a bot and typically not followed.  Network with your target market and get savvy in this area, it is where the passive candidate even looks to see what is going on.

Finding Talent Isn’t Always Going Externally

Hiring in this economy is not a bad so this is not meant as an anti-economic or anti-employment discussion.  As a recruiter, it is my job to find and attract top talent but there are occasions when hiring is not always a solution.

 

Is it possible that companies and management are not looking internally enough for talented individuals for project work?  I have been hearing and conversing with a number of people from companies who are looking externally for subject matter experts in various areas while there is staff internally either interested or available to take on projects.  So what should be done?

 

First, the employee needs to stand up and say they are interested.  The more you let pass over you the less experience you will get and the less you maybe viewed as a valuable employee.  Volunteer.  Get involved.  Make a stand.  Take on this work and show your value.

 

Second, companies while looking at costs don’t always look at the correct or right person for work.  Managers may neither know all of their employee’s skills nor know who maybe interested or qualified to do this work.

 

This is a missed opportunity for both groups.  Bottom line, make yourself known and take on what will add value to you and your company!

Ouch, Careful What You Post

Articles are popping up everywhere on people getting fired or jobs rescinded due to their activity on Twitter and Facebook (exhibit A – http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29796962/wid/11915829).  Not everything you do has to go on Twitter of Facebook… seriously.  You are not the only one on these sites, obviously, and lots of people pay attention to key words and maybe already following you or connected to you somehow.

 

There are some things that just shouldn’t go onto social networking sites:

  • Negative feelings towards your job
  • Negative feelings towards your company
  • Negative feelings towards your boss
  • Negative feelings towards your coworker
  • Negative feelings towards an interview
  • Negative feelings towards your spouse
  • Negative feelings towards your girlfriend/boyfriend

Instead, keep it light or lighter by not being so direct in these areas.  By directly making a negative you are already close to the hot water.  Plus, not everyone wants to hear you complain about whatever.  Pick up the phone and call someone, get out of the house, whatever but don’t put yourself in a position where a momentary lapse of judgment may impact your future.

 

Recruiters look at these sites now to get a feel for a person before you meet them, maybe even before they pick up the phone.

 

Sure, people need to vent but think before you act.  Basic steps and an elementary thought process but it may save you in the future.

Be prepared

The time will come when you will either consider or be forced to look for a new position.  There should always be a few things on your mind in these times.

 

Active or passive.

Active is when you are fully engaged in a search and you are more in “selling” mode than anything else.  Make it your job, or second job.  Spend the time to research companies, positions, chat boards, post questions on Twitter, etc.  Active candidates are also in a touchy area, don’t over sell and don’t undersell.  Know when to speak, when to add details and when to be precise with your answers.  Companies are interviewing numerous candidates for each position and you want to make sure you are at the top of the list.  This is really the bread and butter for recruiters, have a req fill a req and move on.  Make sure you are prepared even when a recruiter calls without notice.  If you need to, schedule a time to speak with them when you may provide your undivided attention and to make the best impression.

 

Passive is when you have a job and receive calls.  The candidate believes they have the control of these conversations because they do not have to do anything, but this is where top recruiters prove themselves.  Recruiters will turn this more into a conversation, probing and networking are commonly the most advantageous avenues to proceed.  Candidates need to remember it is all about perception so be courteous even if interest is low.

 

Jobs

Keep a list of what you apply for.  I know we are in a paperless world, or strive to be.  Figure out what works for you in your job search.  Create folders for positions or companies will help you to straighten positions out.

 

If you print them out, put them in folders, labeled with a copy of the position from the site where you applied and a copy of your resume (only if you have multiple copies of your resume that you distribute).  This will allow you better organization for follow up and, when the recruiter calls, you will be able to immediately refer to your notes.

 

If you save them on your computer, create a folder (Job Search) and copy/paste a document folder for easy access.

 

Both work, what is your preference.

 

Network

Networking isn’t always about being social.  Sure, there are the social sites (Facebook and MySpace) and the professional sites (ZoomInfo, LinkedIn and Spoke) but it is good to mix your messages at times.  If you are active (and not working), let people know if they hear of anything to let you know.  If you are active (and working), obviously be more discreet in your advertising.  If you are passive, just keep your name out there just in case… it never hurts.

 

These are three quick tips to keep in your mind throughout your career.