Get in the Twitter Game

Twitter is everywhere.  It is on your computer as an application (http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/02/19/t-top-20-twitter-applications/), your phone (http://mashable.com/2008/12/21/twitter-mobile-applications/) and maybe even your t-shirt.

The fact is, Twitter is everywhere and everyone it talking about it.  Jon Stewart isn’t such a big fan though (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-OH285DdNM) but the craze is here and growing rapidly.

Whatever your reason for being on Twitter, follow people who might give you valuable insight to it and how best to utilize the technology.  It is never too early or too late to practice good Twitter-tips.  I like Dan Schawbel (@danschawbel) as he provides a variety of tips on Twitter and on Personal Branding which is his specialty.  While I do not agree with everything he puts out, it is very topical and gives some good exposure to different areas.

Build a network of what is of interest to you; jobs, technology, news, politics, finance, gaming, sports, dating, or whatever else and build a common interest theme.  Then, add people outside of this concentration to allow you to join a plethora of conversations and get exposed to a lot of areas.

Once you are on Twitter, join the conversation.  The best way to build your network is to be heard.

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Don’t Forget the Phone

In today’s social networking world it is great to make contacts, build new relationships and gain different perspectives from a diverse area.  Twitter is fantastic for this (find me @kufarms).  Messages, messaging, IM, cell phone applications and email all dominate the work place but don’t forget the phone.

 

Whether you are conducting a job search or looking for candidates for your jobs, don’t rely on the other mediums to convey your message.  Nothing beats speaking to someone about a position and having a discussion.

 

If you make a call for a position, either searching for a candidate or are calling for a specific position, be sensitive to the other person’s time.  You may have caught them in a meeting, at work in a tight space, or otherwise not able to speak.  Give a brief intro and ask for their time now or make an appointment for a later time.  This will often lead to the most successful path.

 

If you are a passive candidate, do the same and take the call (now or later) for only a few minutes.  One of three results may happen: (1) you are interested in the opportunity or (2) you know someone that you may direct to this opportunity or (3) you are not interested and don’t know anyone but made a contact for the future and for networking.

 

I like a method I learned from Shally Steckerl (http://jobmachine.net/shally/) during an online seminar a few years ago and that is the email, call, email method.  Day 1 = email, day 2 = call and day 3 = email follow up.  This is a good approach but I have revised this to the call, email, call method which sometimes works a bit better.  Ultimately, if you are able to know your potential audience and have all contact information then you are able to use either method.

 

Use all of the tools available to you just don’t forget the phone.